Procure Partnerships Framework and contractor partners develop Alzheimer’s Awareness Toolbox Talks

Procure Partnerships Framework and contractor partners develop Alzheimer’s Awareness Toolbox Talks

Procure Partnerships Framework and our Contractor partners are working with the Alzheimer’s Society to create Alzheimer’s Awareness Toolbox Talks that will be delivered across our Contractor Partners’ live sites during July 2020.

Government statistics show that dementia is the leading cause of death in the UK. Nearly one in every eight people died as a result of Dementia in 2018 alone. This was the fourth consecutive year that Dementia ranked highest in causes of deaths in the UK.

With the number of people in the UK living with Dementia expected to reach 1 million by 2021, it is crucial that we commit to raising awareness of the disease and its symptoms so that people can seek medical care.

The Alzheimer’s Society is one of our nominated charities and 30% of our total turnover is put back into the Public Sector, which includes donations to the charities we support. Alzheimer’s Society is the UK’s leading dementia charity which campaigns for change and funds research to find a cure and support people living with dementia today. Through local services the charity has directly helped over 100,000 people to date and is the only UK charity investing in research into dementia care, cause, cure and prevention. The Alzheimer’s Society is committed to spending £150 million on cutting-edge research over the next decade. For every £1 of expenditure, 89p is spent on improving the lives of people with dementia. The remaining 11p is spent on supporting frontline activities.

This initiative was developed through the Procure Partnerships Framework Social Value Group. The Social Value group meets biannually to plan 6 months of non-project specific Social Value activities. The Social Value Group was successfully piloted in the North West and will be rolled out across the North East and London during the course of 2020.

Commenting on behalf of Eric Wright Group, Suzanne Taylor, Group Marketing and CSR Manager said: “Indirectly assisting dementia care, over the last three years The Eric Wright Charitable Trust has donated £635k in supporting Age UK and Carers’ Societies across the North West, whose work provides a valuable support framework for those suffering from dementia or their carers. Aside from this Major and Community Grants programme, the Trust also support any Eric Wright Group employees who participate in fundraising for charities by matching donations. Donations raised specifically for the Alzheimer’s Society by employees over the last 12 months were £800 enabling them to present a cheque of £1,600 direct to their nominated charity.”

Jayne Greaves, Head of Social Value at Willmott Dixon added: “We are committed to leaving a lasting legacy in all the communities in which we work, and key to that is ensuring the social infrastructure we create today is inclusive, accessible and meets the future needs of the ever-growing number of people living with dementia.”

Jayne went on to say: “We’re proud to support organisations like The Alzheimer’s Society and continue to work in collaboration with our customers, local dementia care services and our partners to deliver healthcare, education and leisure facilities designed to support the most vulnerable in our society.”

Conor Neild-Crabb, Marketing Manager at Procure Partnerships Framework, commented on the initiative: “Working with our Contractor Partners on initiatives like raising Alzheimer’s Awareness allows us to find causes to support that have a positive impact on the wider communities around our client organisations. The Social Value Group has been fantastic at pinpointing the activities that will have the greatest impact. The statistics show that 60% of Alzheimer’s cases go undiagnosed, we must raise awareness of the symptoms, prevention measures, and the research being done by organisations like the Alzheimer’s Society”

Further Information about the Alzheimer’s Society can be found at www.alzheimers.org.uk

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